Posted by Hansie Britz on 4 March 2021

PRECISION FARMING / AGRICULTURE

 

       

Precision Farming seeks to use new technologies to increase crop yields and profitability while lowering the levels of traditional inputs. These inputs are needed to grow crops – land, water, fertilizer, herbicides and insecticides. In other words, farmers utilizing precision agriculture are using less to grow more. Precision agriculture is the latest trend in agricultural sectors around the world, because it saves time and reduces cost.

DO YOU NEED TO SWITCH TO PRECISION FARMING???

Yes. It is already profitable and will be inevitable in the future.American farmers already save between $11 000 and $39 000 a year on average. The sooner farmers begin to implement precision farming, the more competitive they will be in the future.

Precision Farming Benefits:

  • Simplified Farming Processes.
  • More cost – efficient farming.
  • More time on hands.
  • Higher yields and more profitable.
  • Better quality produce.
  • Less waste.
  • Higher quality of life.

       

Many farmers are adopting new equipment to make their farming more precise. Tractors can map fields, drives themselves, and check it’s own motion so it doesn’t waste fertilizer, seed or fuel. Farnming technology includes remote sensing with data collection on variables like nutrient levels and soil moisture.

Precision farming is about managing variations in the field accurately to grow more food using fewer resources and reducing production costs. The main goal of “precision farming” is to improve agricultural yield and reduce potential environmental risks.

Future of Precision Farming

Some of the most recently technologies available and under development are the state – of – the – art robots. They are capable of managing crops more and more accurately with the possibility of collecting important data.

NEED TO KNOW MORE OR NEED SOME HELP WITH A BANKABLE AND PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS PLAN OR PROPOSAL CONTACT US NOW: (27)84 583 3143 or money@global.co.za

Posted by Hansie Britz on 25 February 2021

REGENERATIVE FARMING?

     

“Regenerative Farming” is the latest buzz in responsible agricultural management. It is similar to conservation farming. It combines the use of stubble retention, crop rotation and the minimum disturbance of the soil to promote soil health.

Although having the same aims, regenerative farming moves beyond the simple definition of “organic”  and “biological” production. It aims to adapt farming practices to what is happening in and around the plant. It also essentially mimic rather than work against nature.

The key to regenerative agriculture is that it not only “does no harm” to the land but actually improves it. It is done by using technologies that regenerate and revitalize the soil and the environment. Regenerative agriculture leads to healthy soil, capable of producing high quality, nutrient dense food. It simultaneously improve, rather than degrade the land, and ultimately leading to productive farms and healthy communities and economies.

A breakdown of what’s typically involved with regenerating farming include but not limited to:

  • Crop rotation, or successively farming more than one plant on the same land.
  • Cover cropping, or planting year-round so the land isn’t fallow during off-seasons, which helps prevent soil erosion.
  • Conservative tillage, or less plowing of fields.
  • Cattle grazing, which naturally stimulates plant growth.
  • Curtailing the use of fertilizers and pesticides.
  • Animal welfare and fair working practices for farmers.

Regenerative farming practices, such as cover cropping and livestock grazing, aim always to keep a living root in the soil. These practices cycle nutrients without aggressively disturbing the soil to keep carbon stored underground where it belongs. Meanwhile, , composting boosts populations of beneficial soil microbes that feed plants and help them manage pests. This reduces the need for fertilizers, which, when used excessively, can release nitrogen into the air. It also decreases dependence on herbicides and pesticides, which kill healthy bacteria and fungi in the soil.

DO YOU NEED HELP IN SETTING UP A PROFITABLE FARMING OPERATION OR WITH A BANKABLE AND PROFESSIONAL FARMING BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW: (27)84 583 3143 or EMAIL US AT: money@global.co.za

    

Posted by Hansie Britz on 18 February 2021

HOW TO START A SUCCESSFUL FREE RANGE CHICKEN FARM?

       

Free Range Chicken Farming is a method of chicken farming where the chickens are allowed to roam freely outdoors. This is done for a good part of the day rather than being confined in an enclosure for 24 hours.

In most free range chicken farms, the outdoor ranging area is fenced and therefore making the area an enclosure. Chicken meat is generally consumed in all parts of the world and is very healthy. There are many free range farms that raise chickens and making huge profits from their farming operation.

When you running your own free range chicken farming operation, it is better to produce your own chicken feed. One of the most economical  ways of feeding is to grow your own meal-worms as feeding for them. Meal – worms is the most ideal meal to feed free range chickens. It is also less stressful and inexpensive when you do it yourself.

Breed Selection

Free range chicken farmers work with various breeds like:

Meat Production – Cobb, Ross, Arbor Acres, Hubbard.

Egg Production – Lohmann, Browns, Lohman Silver, Hy-Line Silver, Hy-Line Brown, Amber – Link and Lohmann Hybrids.

Other poultry hybrids include the following chicken breeds:

  • Potch Koekoek.
  • Borschvelders.
  • Black Australorps.

With the market for “free range eggs” continuing to grow, more new players are getting into the sector.They raise chickens in a semi – intensive , free range or fully organic system. Many of the new entrants are tempted by the relatively low start up costs. Also, the potentially good margins as free range and organic products tend to fetch a higher price.

TO ENABLE YOU TO START YOUR OWN SUCCESSFUL FREE RANGE CHICKEN FARMING OPERATION YOU WILL NEED HELP WITH A WELL – STRUCTURED CHICKEN FARMING BUSINESS PLAN. CONTACT US NOW FOR PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE AT: (27) 84 583 3143 OR EMAIL: money@global.co.za

                                 

 

Posted by Hansie Britz on 14 February 2021

How to be Successful in Spinach Farming?

            

Spinach is not only full of flavour, but full of goodness too. Spinach is high in iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin c and low in categories. What most of us eat as spinach is usually “Swiss Chard” because it is:

  • Much more available.
  • Easier to grow.
  • Heat tolerant and
  • More productive.

Spinach and Swiss Chard are among the easiest vegetables to grow. They germinate easily, don’t take up much space and are easy to harvest. However, they are gross feeders and need regular feeding to be a great success.

Soil Requirements

Spinach seeds germinate at 2°C to 30°C. However, 7°C to 24°C is optimum. Seeds will not germinate well in warm weather. Although spinach will grow in temperatures ranging from 5° to 24°C, growth is more rapid at 15° to 18°C.

The plant requires a constant and uniform supply of water in order to obtain a good crop of high quality. During spinach production, the soil should never be allowed to dry out. Spinach requires plenty of water, although the soil should have good drainage.

Spinach grows well on a variety of soils, although fertile, sandy loams with a high organic matter content is preferred. Spinach is particularly sensitive to saturated soil conditions and to acidity. The optimum soil pH is 6.2 to 6.9.

Planting

Before planting, prepare and enrich the soil with generous amounts of organics as well as bone meal for root development.

  • Spinach and Swiss Chard can be sown in situ. Swiss Chard can also be sown in seed trays as it transplants better than spinach.
  • Keep the soil moist during germination – which takes about 5 days.
  • Seedlings should be spaced, or thinned out, to about 20cm apart.
  • Feed with a liquid fertilizer about 2 weeks after germination and at least once a month after that..

Plants should be spaced 10 – 20 cm apart in rows that are 30cm apart. This equates to about 160 000+ plants per hectare. Commercial growers that harvest mechanically plant closer together at 15cm by 25cm giving the grower 250 000+ plants per hectare.

Growth Period

Harvesting of the first outer leaves can begin at 60 to 70 days from planting. To ensure longer production periods and higher yields spinach needs Nitrogen in the soil throughout its growing period.

WANT TO KNOW MORE OR NEED A WELL – STRUCTURED FARMING BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW AT: (27)84 583 3143 or Email us at – money@global.co.za

      

Posted by Hansie Britz on 12 February 2021

Battery Recycling

                

It is evident that batteries comprised of various hazardous ingredients. This could be incredibly damaging to the environment when dumped. If we do not recycle them, the hazardous materials are sure to wind up in rivers, soil, and air. However, most batteries are 100% recoverable for better disposal.

Batteries are expensive and have a relatively short life span. As discarded batteries grow by the tonnage, entrepreneurs are enticed to start a business in recycling. The primary objective of building a good battery is long life, safety and low price.. Recycling is an afterthought and manufacturers do little to simplify the retrieving of precious metals. The recycling business is small compared to the vast battery industry, and only lead acid can be recycled profitably.

Lead – acid batteries are an environmental success story with more than 90% of all scrap batteries successfully recycled in South Africa. This is compared with 70% of beverage cans, 65% of news papers, 30% of plastic, and 26% of glass.

Every day thousand of batteries are produced to service everything from industrial machines, automobiles and even golf carts. Anything that needs mobile electricity needs a powerful battery. The problem is that defunct batteries pose an environmental conundrum. If not dealt with correctly the hazardous materials end up being cast away and negatively impact the environment.

Common materials for recycling includes bottles, paper, towels, aluminum cans etc. Niches available in the recycling industry are:

  • Metals recycling.
  • Plastic recycling.
  • Electronic recycling.
  • Water recycling.
  • Oil recycling.
  • Glass recycling.
  • Furniture recycling.
  • Garbage recycling.
  • Tyre recycling.
  • Construction waste recycling.
  • Paper recycling.
  • Battery Recycling.
  • Cartridge recycling and
  • Industrial waste recycling.

According to experts, all sorts of used scrap metal maybe profitable. The waste and recycling sector is a broad one though, and there are lots of areas that remain unexploited.

            

WANT TO KNOW MORE OR NEED HELP WITH A PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW: (27)84 583 3143 OR EMAIL US AT: money@global.co.za FOR A PERSONAL SERVICE.

 

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