Posted by Hansie Britz on 24 April 2021

How to start a Manufacturing Business?

                                 

“Manufacturing” refers to a large – scale production of goods. The goods converts raw materials, parts, and components into finished merchandise using manual labor and/or machines. The finished goods can be sold directly to consumers, manufacturers or wholesalers.

A manufacturing business is any business that uses raw materials, parts and components to assemble finished goods, Manufacturing businesses often employ machines, robots, computers and humans to produce the merchandise. It typically use an assembly line, which enables a product to be put together step by step.

Manufacturing Types:

There are 3 main types of manufacturing production:

  1. Make – to – Stock (MTS).

  2. Make – to – Order (MTO).

  3. Make – to – Assemble (MTA).

Make – to – Stock – (MTS) is a traditional manufacturing strategy that relies on past sales data. The data is used to forecast consumer demand and plan the production activity in advance. The drawback of this strategy is that it uses past data to predict future demand. This increases the likelihood of the forecast being off, leaving the manufacturer with too much or not enough stock.

Make – to – order – (MTO) – This allows customers to order products that are customized and manufactured to their specifications. The manufacturing process begins only after the order is received. So, the waiting time for the customer is longer, but the risk of excessive inventory is cut out.

Make – to – Assemble – (MTA) – This is a strategy that relies on demand forecasts to stock the basic components of a product. Assembling starts after the order is received. It’s a hybrid of MTS and MTO approaches. Customers can customize the products and receive them quicker because the manufacturer has the basic components ready. However, if orders don’t come in, the manufacturer is stuck with a stock of unwanted parts.

To reduce risks, any type of manufacturing business should focus on keeping production costs low. Also, maintaining good quality control and investing in excellent sales management.

TO ENABLE YOU TO SET UP AND RUN A SUCCESSFUL MANUFACTURING BUSINESS YOU WILL NEED A PROFESSIONAL AND WELL – STRUCTURED BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW FOR HELP AT: (27) 84 583 3143 or Email US AT : money@global.co.za

           

 

 

Posted by Hansie Britz on 21 April 2021

Start with Brinjals

                                      

“Brinjals”or Eggplant” is a species of nightshade, and therefore related to the potato and tomatoes. Brinjal is a warm – season crop grown for its edible fruit. Good – quality brinjals can be grown in open lands across various parts of the country year – round.

Soil

Brinjals favor a well – drained loam to sandy loam soil. However, it will grow reasonably well in a wide range of different soil types. Certain criteria in terms of the soil structure and content must be met to make the crop commercially viable. These include nutrient composition, compaction, effective soil depth, pH, crop rotation, herbicide residue and the water- holding capacity of the soil.

Varieties

Different varieties produce fruit of different sizes shapes and colors. This varying from white to yellow or green, reddish purple and dark purple. The currently favored cultivars produce a fruit that is egg-shaped, 12cm to 25 cm long and 6cm to 9cm in diameter, and has a dark purple skin.

Harvesting

Pick Brinjals/eggplant when the skin takes on a high gloss. To test, press the skin. If the indentation doesn’t spring back, that fruit is ready for harvest. To harvest clip the eggplant of the plant with pruning shears, keeping the cap and about 1 inch of the stem intact.

Eggplants” will keep up to two weeks of refrigerated. If you cut open an eggplant fruit and find that the seeds inside have turned brown, the fruit is past prime quality and the flavor may be bitter. The best way to avoid this is by picking fruits on the young side. This is when they are a third or two- thirds of their fully mature size.

NEED HELP WITH A PROFESSIONAL FARMING PLAN OR PROPOSAL? CONTACT US NOW AT: (27)84 583 3143 OR Email: money@global.co.za. YOU CAN ALSO MAKE USE OF OUR ONLINE CONSULTING SERVICES ON ZOOM, SKYPE, FACETIME OR GOOGLE MEET – CONTACT US FOR DETAILS.

             

 

Posted by Hansie Britz on 21 April 2021

PROFITABLE BROCCOLI FARMING

                                   

“Broccoli” has become a far more important crop of late due to its reported health benefits. Broccoli is also much easier to grow than before. The best months for growing broccoli in South Africa is February, March and April.

“Broccoli” is worth growing for its nutritional content alone. The crop is rich in vitamins and minerals. It is a good source of Vitamin A, Potassium, Folid Acid, Iron and Fiber.

Planting Site

* Broccoli requires a site with exposure to full sun – (6-8 hours per day).

* Plant in a bed of moist, fertile soil that drains well.

* Soil pH should be slightly acidic, between 6.0 and 7.0

Planting

* Outdoors – sow seeds 1/2 inch deep and 3 inches apart.

* Indoors – plant transplants that are 4-6 weeks old, outdoors 12 – 20 inches apart. Plant in holes slightly deeper than their container depth.

* Space rows of broccoli should be 3 feet apart.

* Water well at the time of planting.

Harvesting

Broccoli grown from seed will come to harvest in 100 – 150 days. Grown from transplants broccoli will come to harvest in 55 to 80 days. Cut buds when they are still green and tight. Cut the central head with 5 to 6 inches of stem. Leave the base of the plant and some outer leaves to encourage new heads on secondary shoots.

In general, broccoli plants can be harvested two or three times and for a period up to 3 months. Broccoli should be harvested when the heads are small, tight and firm. If flower buds appear, it should be cut immediately.

TO START SUCCESSFULLY YOU WILL NEED A PROPER AND PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS PLAN OR PROPOSAL CONTACT US NOW – (27)84 583 3143 OR EMAIL: money@global.co.za OR MAKE USE OF OUR ON LINE CONSULTING SERVICES ON ZOOM SKYPE OR FACETIME.

                                         

 

 

Posted by Hansie Britz on 1 April 2021

CACTUS / PRICKLY PEAR FARMING

Cactus or prickly pear farming is enjoying renewed interest in South Africa. This is because of the drought and climate change as well as the commercial potential of a crop with abundant uses.

Prickly pear is a surprising simple cactus. Its easy and undemanding to grow. It is also hardy enough to survive in most climates, and boasts a cheery, delicate flower. Prickly pears are a cactus, so they need well- draining soil first and foremost. Plant them in full sun in a sandy or gravely mix and go easy on the water.

Soil

In order for the prickly pear to thrive, it needs to be planted in well-draining soil. Your best bet is a mixture that is dry, sandy, or gravelly. It can also do well in a mixture that is primarily clay, as long as it drains very well and soil does not retain much moisture. Prickly pear isn’t especially high – maintenance and can thrive in a neutral- to -acidic mixture with a pH level of 6.0 – 7.5

Water

Prickly pear cactus is extremely drought tolerant so water it less than you think it needs. In most areas, your typical rainfall will be likely be enough for the cactus to thrive. If not, you can plan to water the plant every two to four weeks.

Fertilizer

When planted outdoors in garden soil, no fertilizer is needed. However, occasional feeding may be required indoors. Use well-balanced fertilizer and let the plant tell you when it needs food. This will be when its green color starts to pale or it doesn’t flower, it should be fed.

Plant Usage

Farmers use the cactus pear to make fodder and silage. Consumers eat the fruit, bio gas made from the plan can produce electricity. Furthermore, the fruit can be used to make oil, juice, jam, jelly, and chutney and the cladodes  can be turned into salads. The ruit is also used to make beer, wine, mampoer or liqueurs.

NEED TO KNOW MORE OR NEED HELP WITH A PROFESSIONAL. BANKABLE BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW FOR HELP AT:

(27)84 583 3143 or email: money@global.co.za.

                        

Posted by Hansie Britz on 11 March 2021

Golden Kiwi Farming

        

Kiwifruits also known as simply “kiwis” are a popular type of edible berry that grows on wines in temperature regions. If you want to grow a kiwi plant for its fruit, purchace a grafted plant from a nursery.

The three types of kiwi fruit are:

1. Common Kiwi – This is the type of kiwifruit typically found in grocery stores. It is a brown/fuzzy fruit with a thick skin and green pulp.

2. Golden Kiwi – Another popular type of kiwi. The golden kiwi is sweeter but more delicate compared to the common kiwi. It is closely related to common kiwifruit but less fuzzy and more yellow.

3. Kiwi Berry – This name usually refers to two different kiwi species, the hardy kiwi and the super-hardy kiwi. These kiwifruits are much smaller compared to common and golden kiwis and have a thinner smooth skin.

Development in the South Africa’s kiwifruit industry has been picking up pace over recent years. There are now 500 ha planted, including 200 ha of yellow varieties. South African growers produce good quality yellow kiwi. They produce it at a time when they can go into a market in Europe ahead of any other Southern Hemisphere players.

Input Costs – Hail netting for a 10 ha orchard will cost about R250 000/ha. To buy and plant young vines and maintaining through their first 3 years of growth can cost R250 000 – R300 000/ha.

The trees enter production in their fourth year. It will cost approximately R60 000/ha/year to manage a mature gold kiwifruit orchard from then on wards.

WANT TO KNOW MORE OR NEED SOME HELP WITH A PROFESSIONAL AND BANKABLE BUSINESS PLAN CONTACT US NOW – (27)84 583 3143 OR EMAIL – money@global.co.za

          

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