sustainable farming

Alpaca Farming – How to start?

                               
Alpaca farming has rapidly becoming one of the most successful and respected farming enterprises in the agriculture sector. Alpacas can provide healthy financial returns, a breeding challenge and a wonderful lifestyle. Alpacas offer an outstanding choice for livestock ownership. Alpacas have a charismatic manner, they do very well on small farms, and they produce a luxury product which is continually increasing in demand.
One of the many reasons why people love alpaca farming is because the camilids fiber are softer, warmer and lighter as compared to wool. Alpacas are also known to come in a wide range of colors which makes it so usable that dyeing is not needed for this product that has 22 shades of color to choose from. Also, alpaca farming in environmental friendly because alpacas do not have a significant impact on the landscape comparing to other animals. The alpacas only has 2 toes and they are very light on their feet.
When starting an alpaca farm, you will need to set up a section of land that will accommodate them. Depending on the farmer and the pack, an acre of land can accommodate from 10 – 15 alpacas comfortably if you are feeding hay and not expecting them to live off pasture. When they live off pastures, the number significantly decreases.
After the land is ready, you need to construct a barn that will act as a shelter for the alpacas. The barn will create a shelter that will keep them cool and away from direct sunlight, which can be uncomfortable for them. It will also keep them dry during the rain. They do not like getting wet, and it can ruin the fleece if it stays moist for a long period of time.
You also need to ensure that you have secured your land with the right fence. Alpacas behave like other animals, whereby they would walk out of the secluded zone if there is nothing to stop them. For that, you need to erect a fence around the land. The fence should be between 4 and a half feet tall. You can either use boards or woven wire, which should be no more than 4 inches apart.
Before starting your alpaca farm, you need to find a local veterinarian that have knowledge of alpacas. Ensure that the vet is close enough, for the sake of checkups, emergencies and other routine shots. When compared with other livestock, alpacas attract very few flies and have very little odor. They’ll typically establish between  two and four dung piles in their enclosure, taking up between 10% and 20% of their entire pasture area. This natural habit makes cleanup and parasite control very easy.

                

TO START AND RUN A SUCCESSFUL AND SUSTAINABLE ALPACA FARMING OPERATION YOU NEED TO START WITH A PROFESSIONAL AND CONVINCING FARMING BUSINESS PLAN – CALL US NOW FOR ASSISTANCE AT: ((27) 84 583 3143 OR EMAIL US AT: money@global.co.za

 

Alpaca Farming – How to start? Read More »

Successful Lettuce Farming

                                                                                   

Lactuca sativa, commonly known as lettuce, is a member of the Asterateae family, grown as a leaf vegetable. The origins of lettuce can be traced to the Mediterranean basin from where it spread to the rest of the world. It has been cultivated as a food source for thousands of years and is popular as a salad ingredient all over the world.

Lettuce is grouped into four classes namely:

1. Crisphead or Iceberg Lettuce

This type is widely grown in the country and it is characterized by firm heads and crisp, curly leaves. The outer leaves are dark green, while the inner ones are pale and lack chlorophyll.

2. Butterhead Lettuce

The butterhead lettuce forms a head that is somehow similar to that of cabbage in shape and has soft, waxy, flexible leaves. It is sensitive to hot weather.

3. Loose – leaf Lettuce

This group does not form heads and is characterized by soft leaves. It grows well both in the open field and under protection and can be shipped over long distances.The cos lettuce has a loose head with narrow soft leaves.  The outer leaves are dark green, coarse and have heavy ribs while the inner is lighter.

Soil Requirements

The plant grows well on a wide variety of soils ranging from light sand to heavy clay, whoever, best results are obtained on fertile loam’s that are rich in organic matter. A pH between 5.5 and 7 is optimum. Lettuce should be grown on soils with a high water – holding capacity and proper drainage for good root growth and plant performance.

                                               

Planting

Lettuce is regularly sown directly in the field to a depth of 10 – 15mm. The seedlings are later thinned out to the desired spacing and they are sometimes used for transplanting. Seedlings for transplanting may also be raised in seed – trays or seedbeds and transplanted about five weeks after sowing.

Irrigation

Lettuce has a shallow root system and as such requires frequent but lighter irrigation’s. The roots penetrate the soil to a depth of only 300mm. Water should be applied throughout the growing period and reduced when the heads become full. A water shortage tends to promote bolting.

Harvesting

Lettuce is harvested by hand by cutting off the plant just above the soil surface to keep most of the outer leaves around the head. Harvesting should be done very early in the morning because lettuce wilts rapidly.

                                                                    

 

 

IF YOU WANT TO START SUCCESSFULLY YOU NEED TO START WITH A PROFESSIONAL AND WELL STRUCTURED FARMING BUSINESS PLAN – CONTACT US NOW At (27) 84 583 3143 or money@global.co.za

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Successful Lettuce Farming Read More »